RIP Ben Gazzara, you lovely sonofabitch with your big voice and boyish smile. This weekend I drink in your honor, and plan to watch this movie as soon as I can get my hands on it.

Last weekend I finally saw Breakfast at Tiffany’s (fuck yeah Netflix Instant) and was blown away by Audrey Hepburn. Her performance in that is everything, just note-for-note perfect and unique and unusual. My favorite part is a long sequence in the middle of the film where she and her neighbor “Fred” decide to spend a day doing things they’ve never done before, pushing each other to try something new, something they’d avoided until now or never before considered. They have a great time doing it and wind up falling for each other. I’ve been very cynical about love as of late, but I think that illustrates the ideal relationship right there.

Last weekend I finally saw Breakfast at Tiffany’s (fuck yeah Netflix Instant) and was blown away by Audrey Hepburn. Her performance in that is everything, just note-for-note perfect and unique and unusual. My favorite part is a long sequence in the middle of the film where she and her neighbor “Fred” decide to spend a day doing things they’ve never done before, pushing each other to try something new, something they’d avoided until now or never before considered. They have a great time doing it and wind up falling for each other. I’ve been very cynical about love as of late, but I think that illustrates the ideal relationship right there.

(via suicideblonde)

a list of things i liked and disliked about tiny furniture

Liked:

-Pacing was solid. I think I found it less witty than it was really structured.

-The side characters. Charlotte was great, I don’t know who she is (daughter of the drummer of Bad Company? OK) but I thought she brought something to every line of dialogue she spoke. I would have liked this movie far less without her. The others were cast appropriately and I found an eery, specific familiarity in almost everyone.

-The journal entries. Thought they were tight.

-I found SOME of it relatable. Your 20s can be tough, it’s right about that. It also doesn’t fail to point out how self-centered we can be at this age.

-The men seemed like assholes and lo and behold, they were assholes.

-The family playing the family. In my mind, the two stand-out scenes were the one with the mother at the end in bed, and the all-out fight with the sister at the party. I think it touched on real feelings and that came through.

-Lena Dunham. It was refreshing to see a girl be confident with her face and her body and not go out of her way to cover up her flaws or try to fit this boring standard of beauty and “perfection” we’re all used to by now. I liked seeing her show off the goods.

Disliked:

-Tagline: “Aura would like you to know she’s having a very, very hard time.” Aura’s character doesn’t feel sorry for herself 100% of the time - sometimes she takes risks and opens herself up to people and sometimes she takes shit and sometimes she doesn’t. But that fucking tagline.

-Upper middle-class “hardships”

-Too many pretentious art references

-Were the Youtube videos meant to seem shitty? Cuz they were

-Almost very conflict was resolved in the following scene. That bothered me. There were some really intense fights and traumatizing things said (that argument with her sister, Jesus!) and yet in the next scene they’re OK again, no damage done. I understand the whole being-there-for-your-family thing, and I fight with people close to me all the time, but the total lack of consequence negates all the drama.

-The ending. I like abrupt. This was so abrupt on such a small moment (a tiny moment, yeah I get it) that I felt it cheated the rest of the film.

-Lena Dunham. I found her delivery to be too subdued to be that interesting, with the exception of when she freaks out on her mother, which was appropriately childish and shrill (been there).

All in all, I’m shocked at how much I enjoyed this movie. I thought I was supposed to hate it, but I’ve been thinking about it all day. I guess I don’t like this sort of whiny, self-centered, privileged, directionless, “white people problems” thing that characterizes the 20 year old indie American filmmaking scene today, but it’s a lot of what’s being made. I do, however, like movies that feel personal—and this WAS personal. These moments in our lives where we feel lost and small are overwhelming and feel important, and are therefore not unworthy of exploration. I just wish we had more to say sometimes.

THANK GOD someone made a movie on Genesis and Lady Jaye P-Orridge’s most famous creation - themselves, as Breyer P-Orridge. It’s a fascinating, unique thing they did for love and art and whatever else, and I was hoping for deeper insight. Looks like someone finally did it with The Ballad of Genesis & Lady Jaye.

I had the privilege of seeing Genesis speak at IFC earlier this year at a screening of the British film If… and it was just terrific. I’ve been a fan of Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV for awhile now, but Genesis is a tremendous speaker, full of anger and passion and purpose and clever, clever wit. With any luck, this doc will embody some of his/her madness and I’m looking forward to it.

"We have nothing to say, and we’re saying it."

Dogtooth, I wasn’t sure I was gonna like this movie, if only because it’s almost TOO close to the kind of thing that interests me, but I did, it was great, beautiful, depraved, unique, watched it 2 days in a row, definitely not for everyone, arguably not for most, Dogtooth.

Tags: dogtooth movie

amadeus + death

My boyfriend hasn’t seen many classic movies - or many movies at all, really - so last night I showed him one of my favorites, Amadeus. A rare 80s Oscar winner that still holds up, it features some iconic performances, stunning production value and some of the best music every composed. But every time I watch it, I’m reminded that Amadeus is the movie that taught me about death. Here’s how it went down:

1) My entire religious education took place when I was 4 years old and attended Christ the King Nursery School in Jersey. The church spent most of that year talking about something they were building underneath a giant blue curtain. What they ultimately revealed: a hideous, oversized crucifix, with Jesus’s sad eyes pinned squarely on mine.

2) It was around this time that I caught the end of the film, because apparently my parents have never felt the need to censor me from anything. Anyway, I thought that when I was watching the scene (feature above) where Mozart dictates his Requiem to Salieri on his death bed, that I was watching Salieri (literally) work Mozart to death IN REAL TIME*. It’s a credit to the acting I guess but it scared me shitless.

3) One day soon after, I came home from the grocery store with my mom and realized I’d left my favorite My Little Pony behind. I was so distraught I made her drive me back to the store to find it, but it was lost forever. When we returned a second time, I was still crying when my neighbor ran in and told me that my preschool teacher had died. My mom did her best to calm me down, and amidst my sadness and confusion I asked her, “Is teacher in heaven with Jesus and Mozart?” She told me yes*.

*Note: I am still just as gullible.

* Opening credits to Gaspar Noe’s ENTER THE VOID. This movie was incredible.

* Disturbing footage of a guy having a bad trip in an LA movie theater. A friend of mine was in the audience when this happened, distressed over how people were handling the situation.

* What would Stanley Kubrick do?

* Saw this last night. It was fucking epic. Unfortunately the midnight screening was sold out, which Sasha Grey was attending, but instead I got to sit next to my girl Shelly, and two coked up dudes splitting 4 call girls for the night, who were endlessly entertained and perplexed by the film.